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Archive for 2014

Over the past year or two several new backup utilities have become popular. These new tools tend to avoid the use of tar.gz files, and just store backups as collections of files. Usually these storage areas are incrementally updated and avoid wasting space thanks to the detection of duplicate content. Here we're going to look at one of them in particular "attic".

In this brief article we'll demonstrate using Redis for a publish/subscribe system. There are dedicated publish-subscribe platforms out there, but Redis is reasonably performant and essentially configuration-free.

This article documents the process of configuring a git host, using gitbucket, which will give you a graphical interface to a collection of git repositories, accessible via any browser, along with support for groups, issues, and forks.

HAProxy is a TCP/HTTP load-balancer, allowing you to route incoming traffic destined for one address to a number of different back-ends. The routing is very flexible and it can be a useful component of a high-availability setup.

This article is designed to introduce the process of PXE-booting a host directly into the Debian installer, and then automating the installation via the Debian PreSeed configuration. Both of these topics have been covered in the past, but not together - and we'll also include notes on testing this setup with KVM.

I've got a webserver which runs a particular service, and that service is sufficiently interesting and important that I run monitoring probes against it every 30 seconds. Those particular requests clutter my logs, and here is a brief note on how to avoid that clutter.

The new upload of GNU Make 4.0 recently reached Debian's unstable distribution, and has also migrated to the testing distribution, currently codenamed "jessie". GNU Make 4.0 brings in several new features, perhaps the most interesting of which is support for the use of plugins.

The Debian project is pleased to announce the fifth update of its stable distribution Debian 7 (codename "wheezy"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

A serious security flaw has come to light in the OpenSSL package used in many Linux distributions including Debian. It is considered very serious and all administrators should patch their systems at once and restart any services that rely on OpenSSL.

Serverspec is the name of a Ruby tool which allows you to write simple tests, to validate that a server is correctly configured. Here we'll walk through the installation of the tool, and show how it can be used to test a server setup.

If you run a multi-user system it can increase security if you hide the display of running processes, and their arguments, which belong to other users. This helps avoid problems if users enter passwords on the command-line, and similar.

The Debian project is pleased to announce the ninth update of its oldstable distribution Debian 6.0 (codename "squeeze"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the oldstable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

Prosody is a Lua-powered chat-server, which has been around for a few years now. Prosody is very straight-forward to install and configure, and the reliability means that it is a perfect way to provide chat-services to a small office, company, or group of friends. This brief article will cover installing it, both natively and within docker, along with a few pointers to things you can do with it.

The Debian project is pleased to announce the fourth update of its stable distribution Debian 7 (codename "wheezy"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

In our previous introduction to docker we demonstrated how to create images, and manipulate them. That was useful but not as useful as the use of "Dockerfiles", which allow you to automatically build your own images.

There are several programs, and systems, out there for supervising the execution of child-processes. Perhaps one of the most well-known is runit, which was modelled upon the daemontools software by djb.

This article is a brief introduction to docker, which is a utility for manipulating lightweight containers, allowing you to quickly spin up multiple isolated environments on a single host-machine.

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